Flash Flood Information
(Adapted from Okanogan Conservation District Website)

KNOW WHAT TO EXPECT
  • Flooding is possible if it has been raining upstream.
  • Know the area, and know the flood risk based on proximity to creeks, waterways, steep slopes, coulees and canyons.
  • Burned trees and rocks may wash down and pile up bridges, culverts, and other river obstructions.
  • Sediment and ash may wash off the burned area into the streams, changing the color of the water to brown or black.
  • Bridges and culverts may wash out.
BE READY
  • Sign up to receive emergency notifications (OkanoganDEM.org).
  • Be aware of rising water in ditches, streams, creeks, and rivers.
  • If your home is in a risky area, such as below a steep slope or at the mouth of a canyon or gully, have an evacuation plan and/or emergency supplies for 72 hours. Contact your insurance agent about the National Flood Insurance Program.
  • Do not hike or drive in narrow canyons when flash flooding is possible.
  • Listen for bulletins on local radio stations, or use a NOAA weather radio for the most up to date weather reports.
WHEN A FLASH FLOOD BEGINS
  • Move up, not out!
  • Move to higher ground away from all waterways.
  • Do not drive or walk through flooded areas.
  • If you see downed power lines or electrical wires, stay away and contact the local utility company.

STANDING DEAD TREES: SNAG SAFETY

    Burned tree roots can cause trees to be very unstable. Even a light wind can cause these trees to fall or lose sections. Be watchful and avoid unstable trees.
  • Avoid burned forest areas on windy days.
  • Avoid parking near burned trees.
  • When driving through burned areas, carry a saw or an ax in case trees fall and block the way out.
For more detailed information visit our wildfire recovery page at www.okanogancd.org/Fires

Information adapted from www.rweact.org

 
 
 
 
 
 
315 Riverside Avenue / PO Box 71    Winthrop, WA 98862     509.996.2870